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Posts Tagged ‘Elmer Beckworth

Is there a serial killer sitting in the Rusk, TX jail for a few weeks?

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Offender Name: Larry Max Pugh, Jr.
Custody Status: In Custody
Age: 45
Location: CHEROKEE COUNTY JAIL
Race: White
Offender ID: 18051113362144
Gender: Male
Date of Birth: 10/18/1972
Aliases: Larry Pugh

Cherokee County, TX:

Former City of Jacksonville police officer and serial rapist Larry Pugh is back in town for the next few weeks doing a short stint in the county jail. According to the Daily Progress and reports from the district attorney himself, Pugh has completed his federal sentence and can quietly sit out Elmer Beckworth’s 2006 “assault with a deadly weapon” charge through August, courtesy of the Rusk, Texas jail.

Pugh’s “assault” crime: trying to kidnap and murder a woman in a makeshift police van before she could testify in federal court about being raped at gunpoint in the Jacksonville City Cemetery.  The deadly weapon: a belt around her neck and his service revolver. (Source: Daily Progress)

No mention of the $300,000 civil suit settlement the City of Jacksonville was facing from nine (9) different women who were also raped on the side of the road by Officer Pugh while he was on duty. (Source: US Court of Appeals Fifth Circuit) If Pugh were brought up on actual murder charges, then the Federal Courts, the FBI and the City of Jacksonville would be proven “deliberately indifferent” to the testimony of 25 to 30 witnesses. (Source: KLTV)

The public is supposed to believe the reprinted lie that Larry Pugh tracked down his rape victims by “open records via the Freedom of Information Act” after they filed complaints. The FOIA has denied these reports according to KLTV Channel 7.  In fact, he was told by investigators the names of those who came forward to testify. They were named in his indictment and went missing before his trial. (Source: The Pugh Connection, KLTV)

Jacksonville Police Officer Larry Pugh

Are the families of missing Jacksonville women going to have closure with the release of former J’ville Police Officer Larry Pugh from federal prison?

Not according to Elmer Beckworth, even though two missing Jacksonville women’s remains have been identified as Pugh’s FBI complainants set to testify against him in federal court. Why the blasé attitude about a federally convicted rapist and the number one murder suspect? It’s simple: East Texas authorities want to protect the City of Jacksonville from more potential civil right suits and public scrutiny. Elmer Beckworth works with the same Jacksonville law firm that represents the City and County during Pugh’s civil rights violation cases. They want his crimes buried the same way they discard his victims. They write them off as “prostitutes” and transient “drug addicts,” while reminding us Cherokee County’s halfway homes are whorehouses frequented by law enforcement.

Remember: these women went missing AFTER Pugh’s indictment and before his trial.

According to the Jacksonville Police Department there is no connection between Pugh and MISSING FBI COMPLAINANT TERRI REYES, even though she is one of several named victims in Pugh’s original sex assault indictment. They removed her name after she went “missing” as reported by KLTV to avoid “speculation,” i.e. civil rights lawsuits against the city. The US District Court, along with every other incestuous agency in the region would rather bury civil rights violations than have the City of Jacksonville held responsible for their hiring practices. They would rather delete the names of the deceased in the Indictment than close the multiple homicide cases resulting in their cover up.

When Larry Pugh was indicted last February. One of his accusers was an unidentified woman with the initials T.R.

Those are the same initials as Terri Reyes, an Athens woman who went missing last May and whose body was found in the Angelina National Forest in September.

The original indictment against Pugh says he sexually assaulted T.R., depriving her of her constiutional right to liberty and bodily integrity, but in the subsequent indictments, issued after Reyes went missing, T.R. is never mentioned.

The Nacogdoches attorney in a recent civil lawsuit against Pugh told us by phone he would have called Terri Reyes as a witness in the trial, but she disappeared before he had a chance. (Source: The Pugh Connection: KLTV 7 Investigates)

If they wanted to charge him for the disappearance of federal witnesses, then they would.

What Larry Pugh did in 2005 only scratches the surface of the sexual misconduct going on by Cherokee County, TX law enforcement. We have a district attorney’s office that uses the wives and in-laws of investigators to blackmail political rivals and contaminate jury pools.  We have a Sheriff Department that has engaged in illegal wiretapping for decades, with the blessing of federal and DEA agents. A rapist cop is another lowlife they own. Be on the lookout when he moves back in next door to the local brothel shelter.

Pugh has remained a suspect in several missing women’s homicides, even though authorities have tried to keep the cases closed. (Source: KTBS)

Reprinted from the Tyler Paper dated June 20, 2014 “Remains identified as 2006 missing person: Woman was possible witness against former J’Ville officer

The remains of a woman who disappeared eight years ago after making outcries of sexual abuse against a former Jacksonville police officer have been found, officials reported on Friday.

Skeletal remains of Shunte M. Coleman, who was last seen July 3, 2006, were found on March 12 by a forester in a thickly wooded area in San Augustine County, east of the “T” intersection of Farm-to-Market Road 1196 and County Road 347, officials said Friday in a news release.

In 2007, Alvin Boykin talked to the Tyler Morning Telegraph about the day his friend, Ms. Coleman, left his Jacksonville home on foot. He said then that his home was an ad hoc shelter, offered to anyone needing a place to stay.

Shunte M. Coleman

Ms. Coleman, a mother of two, had freely come and gone from his residence — but so had a handful of other women needing a boost. So when Ms. Coleman said she was leaving for a while, Boykin watched her go.

She didn’t come back. Neither did another frequenter, Terri Renee Troublefield Reyes, who disappeared around the same time as Ms. Coleman. The 38-year-old Athens woman was last seen alive on May 21, 2006, and was found dead and unclothed in Angelina National Forest in fall 2006.

Terri Reyes

The women knew each other from Boykin’s home, and both were pinpointed as potential witnesses to testify against former Jacksonville police officer Larry Pugh.

In 2006, Pugh was sentenced to 12 years in prison for the sexual assault of women while on duty and retaliating against a woman for reporting the crime.

Ms. Coleman and Ms. Reyes both went missing while Pugh was out of jail on bond — between February 2006 and August 2006.

In 2007, Pugh pleaded guilty to perjury for lying about sexually assaulting women while on duty. The next year, he was sentenced to 18 months for perjury. He was sued in two additional lawsuits by eight women claiming they also were sexually assaulted by him while he was an officer.

Larry Pugh

According to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Pugh, 41, is incarcerated in Marianna, Florida, in a medium-security federal correctional institution with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp. His release date is listed as May 13, 2018.

Shortly after Ms. Reyes’ remains were identified through DNA testing in 2007, attorney Curtis Stuckey told the Tyler Morning Telegraph that he might have used Ms. Reyes as a witness in the civil trial, but he never had an opportunity to talk to her because she disappeared.

“She had made an outcry” to law enforcement, like several other women, he said.

Stuckey represented a 43-year-old Jacksonville woman who was raped and retaliated against by Pugh in a civil lawsuit against the former officer.

Stuckey said he also would have been interested in talking to Ms. Coleman as a possible witness against Pugh if she had not disappeared.

San Augustine Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Gary Cunningham said Friday that at this point, law enforcement cannot connect Pugh to Ms. Coleman’s disappearance and death, but officials are not ruling out any potential suspects.

He said an active investigation is being continued by the San Augustine County Sheriff’s Office, the Texas Rangers and the FBI.

The San Augustine County Sheriff’s Office, with assistance from the Angelina County Sheriff’s Office, the Texas Rangers and the FBI, recovered the remains, which were examined by a forensic anthropologist at Sam Houston State University and then delivered to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification, where DNA extracted from the remains were entered into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), officials said.

On Thursday, the San Augustine County Sheriff’s Office and the Jacksonville Police Department were notified that the remains belonged to Ms. Coleman.

The woman who won the civil lawsuit against Pugh in 2007 testified in federal court that she was walking one night in March 2005 when Pugh offered her a courtesy ride in his police car. Instead of taking her where she wanted to go, he took her to a dark, empty trailer house.

“He raped me,” she said crying. “I was too scared to do anything.”

She said Pugh drove her back to the neighborhood and dropped her off.

In August 2006, after Pugh had been indicted on federal charges, the woman was again walking at night when a man in a van who was wearing sunglasses approached and offered her a ride. She said she recognized Pugh’s voice and declined.

As she walked away, Pugh got out of the vehicle and took his belt off. The two struggled and the victim tried to fight him, but he put his belt around her neck, she said. Pugh began dragging her toward his van and “by the grace of God,” the belt snapped and she escaped.

The woman admitted she had a criminal record and was fighting a crack addiction, she said.

Pugh pleaded guilty to the charges but denied ever having sex with her or any of the other women.

Joe Evans, an investigator for the Cherokee County District Attorney’s Office, testified at the time that the plaintiff was the first of many women who made outcries claiming they were sexually assaulted by Pugh.

Evans said he talked to 25 to 30 witnesses, including women who claimed they had been raped by Pugh and people they had told, including ministers and police officers, who substantiated their claims. He said the witnesses were from Athens, Tyler and other areas.

Evans said Pugh preyed on vulnerable women who lived on the street and had drug or legal problems. One-third of them had pending charges, one-third of them were on parole or probation and one-third of them had no criminal charges, he said.

 

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Written by Cherokee County, Texas

05/17/2018 at 6:00 PM

Drug Deals and Insurance Pay Offs for all

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Bascom Bentley’s bailiff was sent to federal prison for selling crystal meth. (Source: Jacksonville Progress)

Pct. 3 Constable Randall “Randy” Lee Thompson, was arrested by the FBI January 12, 2006 on federal charges of possession and distribution of pseudoephedrine, a component of methamphetamine. According to official reports “on or about Nov. 7, 2005,” Thompson “did knowingly and intentionally possess and distribute approximately 108 grams of a pseudoephedrine” which is a List 1 chemical used to create the schedule II controlled substance methamphetamine. FBI agents had videotape footage of Thompson dealing drugs out of his Jacksonville, TX residence. (Source: Jacksonville Progress) Prior to Thompson formally being charged in Tyler’s federal court, District Judge Bascom Bentley ordered an official removal hearing in Rusk with claims that Thompson never performed his elected duties despite Thompson signing for Pct. 3’s and the district court’s certified mail for years while employed full time at the TDCJ Hodge’s Unit. Constable Thompson (who was appointed by County Commissioners with everyone’s blessing) was ousted from office because of his looming federal drug case that was deliberately squelched in Bentley’s hearing. (Source: Jacksonville Progress)  In other words, they lied to keep Thompson’s well-known and ongoing drug dealing off the record; they claimed he wasn’t showing up to work. Bascom Bentley’s hearing was an orchestrated whitewash, not immediately but weeks after Thompson’s arrest and resignation. Thompson pleaded guilty in federal court on March 6, 2006. (Source: Jacksonville Progress) He was released in September 2013.

Why so much corruption in such a small place?

I have been doing internet research on East Texas corruption and came across the interview of Joe Gray from Henderson, TX posted in 2001.  Mr. Gray gives detailed accounts of his experiences in nearby Anderson County and his theories about District Judge Bascom Bentley.

Judge Bentley also operates in neighboring Cherokee County and Leon County.

Joe Gray’s article states East Texas officials have generationally benefited from the ongoing narcotics trade by being involved in it at every level. Not only are federal monies under the Byrne grants siphoned off by these corrupt small town law enforcement agencies, but local officials use the Tulia Laws to grab up foreclosed property of supposed drug dealers. One of Mr. Gray’s talking points is that Bascom Bentley III owned over 600 acres in Anderson County; land he apparently did not inherit but accumulated over the years to sell off. Tulia law injustices are common and even more common are Byrne grant monies being swindled to family members and political allies.

Mr. Gray’s para-military/militia preoccupation would make his wild claims of “black helicopters” and DNA theft at the county jail seem laughable to the outside media and the US Attorney’s office, thus making him, in the eyes of local officials, the ideal candidate for property foreclosure. Those who publicly complain about the corruption have been met with law suits, police raids, and death.

In Bentley v. Bunton- Texas, in 1996 Judge Bascom Bentley successfully filed a defamation suit against a Palestine radio talk show host who called the judge “corrupt” among other things on air. If that were the case then the South East Texas Political Review whose radio talk show host calls by name the entire judiciary in Beaumont “corrupt and incompetent” would be liable (libel?) Who knows? Bentley may have just benefited by being in the system when the thousands of acres in Palestine and surrounding areas were seized and put up for sale. Being a district judge may have given him first shot at low bid at the Sheriff’s Auction.

Whatever the basis of Joe Buntly’s “personal vendetta” against the Anderson/Cherokee County judge, the fact remains the legal and law enforcement system operating with the corrupt Dogwood Narcotics Task Force out of Palestine, has branched into drug dealing. And under Tulia laws, a simple accusation results in forfeiture of property. The rest of Texas is shying away from this practice and there is now legislation to reign in these rouge anti-drug task forces. It took Governor Rick Perry to pardon 35 innocent defendants convicted under Tulia laws, while the good ol’ boys who prosecuted them ‘retire’ to Lake Palestine and Lake Jacksonville (with a little extra cash and land).(Source: CBS News)

The drug trade in neighboring Cherokee County involves local constable precincts, not the district courts per se. The district courts are involved in more personal enrichment schemes, like sexual blackmail of enemies and phone tapping. Typically Anderson County probably does not operate the same as its twin sister Cherokee County. I would call Cherokee County the genetically defunct second cousin to Anderson County. Judge Bentley behaves one way on the record in Anderson County court and completely different in Cherokee County because he knows he is unaccountable in the Rusk, TX courthouse.

Cherokee County is simply not astute enough in its own self-worship to produce an official who would clean up the mess, without being extorted or blackmailed by the District Attorney’s office. God knows they hate people talking about them, i.e. they have convinced themselves that it is moral, albeit illegal, to tape record phone calls of citizens throughout the county. They will collectively smear and repeat any propaganda that the District Attorney tells them, not matter how ludicrous or unrealistic, for job security. Mind you 90% of them are related. What a way to make an East Texas living.

Cherokee County law enforcement turns a blind eye to its own internal drug activity while at the same time paying off drug mules and jail house snitches. It is the usual suspects, one being a former DEA agent out of the Dogwood Narco-Force and a recently “retired” Cherokee County District Attorney Investigator.

Readers should applaud that the corrupt Dogwood Narcotics Task Force, based out of Palestine is no more. The only thing the unchecked Tulia Laws created with this pseudo-agency was the ongoing drug trade by Cherokee County law enforcement. There is a vacuum of drug dealing to fill, now that these good ol’ Christian men have “retired.” It takes neighboring Smith County and the US Attorney to file charges on the current culprits while at the same time relying on the same people for drug bust quotas.

In regards to the drug dealing of law enforcement in Cherokee County; let me give you some info on Cherokee County’s unscrupulous activity to be found on the internet. These news articles list the illegal activity in Cherokee County just this year alone, in 2006!!! The firing of Constable Precinct 3 Randall Thompson who was also the Cherokee County District court’s bailiff for Judge Bascom Bentley III. Fired for not showing up for his bailiff post. Local media portrays Thompson as missing for 6 months, then gathered a constable’s hearing together the day before Thompson was indicted in federal court.

Ostensibly, the district court did not know that Constable Randy Thompson had been making and selling speed, if you believe such nonsense. Details can be found at the US Department of Justice news releases. Constable Randall Thompson had participated in all his assigned duties up to and after posting bond.

  • Chief of Police Chester Kennedy of Troup and Sgt. Mark Turner arrested by Smith County Sheriff Department for selling drugs. NO arrests by Cherokee County officials.
  • Jacksonville, TX police officer Larry Pugh molesting women during traffic stops; it takes the FBI to arrest him and charge him on 9 counts of rape and assault. AND when the guy is out on bond he tries to kill one of victims to keep from testifying.
  • More on Troup, Texas Police Chief Chester Kennedy caught tampering with drug evidence in future posts.
  • In New Summerfield, north of Rusk on Hwy 84. Chief of Police and city treasurer fired; mayor resigns after cleaning house.
  • A Jacksonville, TX woman is run down and killed in her own apartment complex. No investigation required according to current Cherokee County District Attorney Elmer C. Beckworth, Jr. The victim was a drunk ‘passed out in the parking lot.’ Beckworth offered no explanation for not bringing the case to trial; why bother to convene a formal grand jury when you know the outcome. Why even bother to NO-Bill the culprit, it’s easier to smear a hit-and-run fatality to the media.

To combat the systemic corruption, HB 1239 was written in 2004 and debated after the Tulia debacle, when 46 people were rounded up in Swisher County Texas during a drug sting and put on trial. Their properties were seized and several quick convictions handed down. The Dogwood Trails Narcotic Task Force was quietly dissolved after bad publicity leaked out about 72 indigent defendants with court appointed Anderson County lawyers being set free after their properties were seized. 60 Minutes did an expose’ in 2004 of the sham arrests in Tulia, TX.

The televised interview tells it all. Complete with gypsy cops with criminal records.

There were never any official arrests on record in Cherokee County by the Dogwood Task Force, though they conducted numerous raids. One botched raid simultaneously occurred in Jacksonville and Alto, TX, when the Force raided the wrong homes in an obvious attempt at “asset seizure.” The Department of Justice documented that the Dogwood Trails Narcotic Task Force operating under the radar in Cherokee and Anderson County reported no seized assets during the year 2002, despite having conducted numerous raids. And no arrests to back up the raids. Where did the seized drugs and money go???

In neighboring Cherokee County, the get rich scheme of choice is insurance fraud. This trend started decades ago. Fire insurance policies are underwritten as quickly as property is destroyed. Unlicensed insurance agents have frequently set up shop in small towns like Alto, TX and Rusk, TX. Any ‘claims adjustment’ is done by local law enforcement. The county has been operated for over 30 years by family members and in-laws of the Cherokee County District Attorney’s office. Namely, former District Attorney Charles Holcomb, who is now a sitting Justice on the Court of Criminal Appeals in Austin.

Judge Charles Holcomb has deliberately omitted some factual tidbits from his State Bar profile about his “last big case in Alto, TX” back in 1990, in which Holcomb convicted an innocent man. Holcomb fails to mention in his profile that the 12th Court of Criminal Appeals in Tyler, which Holcomb was sitting on, reversed this conviction in 1993.


Charles Holcomb’s state bar profile on “his last colorful case in Alto, TX” should accurately read: In 1990, Cherokee County District Attorney Charles Holcomb succeeded in convincing a biased jury to convict an innocent man of murder. The victim’s CPA, Terry Watkins of Nacogdoches, was sentenced to life in prison by relatives of the deceased who were planted on the trial jury. And lied during voir dire to be seated on the case–a typical Cherokee County maneuver. Holcomb also refused to recuse himself.

After intense public outcry and scrutiny, Watkins’ attorney John Heath, Sr. (also of Nacogdoches, TX) was able to successfully petition the Tyler Court of Appeals and had Terry Watkins released 5 years into his life sentence. It was shown that “the sheriff deputy first on the scene,” as Holcomb’s publicist recalls, and the widow shared the “$800K” life insurance policy with the Cherokee County District Attorney’s Office “to hire outside state witnesses” and according to Holcomb’s statements to KTRE an investigator paid “not to solve the case.”

District Attorney Charles Holcomb not only accepted money from the deceased’s father to hire an expert witness, Holcomb also accepted money from the murder victim’s widow to hire a private investigator. In an obvious attempt at shifting the onus of suspicion away from anyone other than Mr. Terry Watkins. Or in defense attorney John Heath, Sr.’s comments to hire an investigator but “not to solve the case.” However the investigator was not allowed by Holcomb to interview the widow nor the Cherokee County Constable first on the scene. Eventually this private investigator came to Terry Watkins’ defense during resentencing. As stated earlier, the sheriff deputy as Holcomb ‘vaguely’ recalls was actually a Cherokee County Constable Precinct 2 who formally married the victim’s wife months after the murder.

The widow and Cherokee County Constable live happily ever after, splitting a murdered man’s estate, the recipients of an accurately reported $650,000 life insurance payout to everyone involved. As if Charles Holcomb, the prosecutor and now a sitting Justice did not remember. Well preserved news article of the murder trial speak volumes.

Back to Justice Charles Holcomb’s state bar profile, especially the part where he discusses “his last big case in Alto” from 1990. Charles Holcomb, as District Attorney, accepted monies from the widow of murdered business owner Jackie Hicks of Alto, TX as reported by KTRE and the Lufkin News, ostensibly to send a private investigator on a wild goose chase to south Texas. Even though Holcomb had the coffers of the state of Texas at his disposal. Even though the number one suspect would have normally been the promiscuous widow receiving the $600- $800K insurance policy taken out on her estranged husband, Jackie Hicks. Of course the widow and her lover (a Cherokee County Constable “first on the scene”) were never formally questioned nor deposed by the then District Attorney Charles Holcomb nor by his ‘investigator.’

Holcomb gives his version of events to the State Bar in an attempt to rewrite history. The fact is an innocent man was released after 5 years on the above mentioned technicalities because of Charles Holcomb’s handling of the case. The question on the jurors’ and the community’s mind was why was the District Attorney Charles Holcomb accepting money to “hire state witnesses” when he had the coffers of the State of Texas and Cherokee County at his disposal?

A double indemnity policy pays out for accidental deaths and would not have paid out in case of a homicide, another misdirection of the Cherokee County District Attorney’s office even then. Holcomb’s quick recap of the case in his State Bar profile quotes the widow “was rumored to have multiple affairs” throughout the community. Because of the number of multiple lovers of the widow that the defense called, State v. Terry Watkins (1990) was the longest running criminal trial in Cherokee County history.

Cherokeean Herald August 2, 1990

District Attorney Charles Holcomb was elected to the 12th Court of Appeals in Tyler, TX and his assistant Cherokee County District Attorney, Elmer C. Beckworth, Jr. continued the façade that the murder of Jackie Hicks was thoroughly “investigated.” The case against Terry Watkins received so much public outcry and so many people cried foul, that the next-in-line Alto, TX police chief Thomas Griffith was called to a grand jury.

Tyler Morning Telegraph article about former Alto, Texas police chief Thomas Griffith predicting the conviction of Terry Watkins for the murder of Alto, TX business owner Jackie Hicks would be reversed and the case reopened because:

“there are people in this area who possess information that would be very useful in this case.” Chief Griffith would eventually be drummed out of his position by Charles Holcomb’s relatives on the Alto, TX city council. Thomas Griffith had publicly maintained his belief that Terry Watkins was in fact innocent and had evidence to back up his statements. Holcomb’s former investigator would eventually become the police chief of Alto, TX, a revolving door position. Any evidence maintaining Watkins’ innocence would be ignored by Beckworth, et al, until Watkins’ conviction was overturned.

Elmer Beckworth argued for the State and against Watkins’ early release which was eventually granted. The 12th Court of Appeals reversed that conviction and acquitted Watkins in 1992 of capital murder. At a 1995 resentencing, Watkins was denied an early release and sentenced to five years for murder (he had already served over 4 years) as reported in 1996 by Charles Holcomb’s hometown paper The Cherokeean Herald.

Cherokeean Herald Feb. 22, 1996

Terry Watkins was freed by the Texas 12th Court of Appeals, with a commuted murder sentence, thereby closing the door on a local ‘investigation’ into the murder of Jackie Hicks of Alto. However, the statute of limitations is always open for the State’s Attorney to seek murder charges. If any reader has information on this conspiracy, they should contact the Attorney General’s office. Those guilty of this crime should not go unpunished, no matter whose wing they may be under and no matter how long it takes.

It may be commonplace in East Texas for innocent people to be charged with crimes committed by law enforcement, however a sitting Justice on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals lying to the State Bar about a murder case he prosecuted and lost on appeal is another thing all together. Good luck on your website and your expose’ of East Texan politics both good and bad. The narco-trade is alive and well in Cherokee County. Each time I read about one, I’ll post it for the world to see. Who knows, maybe a 6th grader in Rusk, TX might want to do a book report on local corruption or the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. Or a kid in China might want to find out what’s going on in East Texas. Or a Houston or Dallas/FW based entrepreneur might have second thoughts about doing business in a county that has an entrenched history of drug dealers, rapists and murderers on the payroll.

County hides court records from State

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efiletxcourtsgov_slider

Child molesters are called to sit on Cherokee County juries.

Recently sworn in elected officials and commissioners are pressuring Austin lawmakers to keep Cherokee County court records off the state-mandated E-filing system. It’s OK for the other 253 counties to upload cases for review; Cherokee County operates in the dark. (Source: Daily Progress 1/12/17) With illegal wiretaps throughout the county, they all know each other’s dirty laundry. They also know if they get their brainwashed talking points published in the local newspapers, then they can disregard any law on the books. They can go back to intercepting each other’s emails and blackmailing one another.

pay-off

A recent Court of Criminal Appeals order requires counties with populations of 50,000 to implement the mandatory criminal court filings by July 1, 2019. (Source: E-file)

According to Cherokee County Clerk Laverne Lusk, it costs too much money to use the Internet to file court records. Secondly, she claims dismissed criminal cases will remain online, even after expungement.

“Our concern is that (since) there will be a fee, it will take revenue away from the county,” Lusk said. “It’s also a concern that if a case is dismissed and needs to be expunged, that it won’t be taken off (completely) from the web.” (Source: Daily Progress 1/12/17)

The fact is most E-file legal services cost under $7 per filing or at a monthly rate of $100 for unlimited access. Are Daily Progress readers stupid enough to believe that honest prosecutors prefer to hide their cases in the courthouse basement? Or do they want botched cases to be available only to a select few in Rusk, TX designated to tamper with government documents? It’s not that they are sloppy and lazy. They simply want to hide their own collusion and relatives on their stacked juries. They want to cover their tracks and prove the Letter of the Law does not apply to them. Elmer Beckworth does not want the court record readily available to the public that shows the local pedophiles who have repeatedly been seated as Grand Jury foreman. (Source: Jacksonville Progress) It is yet another smoking gun the Attorney General chooses to ignore.

There is some pretty digusting shit being shielded from the public, such as the Harorld “Bo” Scallon network’s penchant for sadomasochistic images of young children being tortured, murdered and raped. That never stopped them from serving on Cherokee County grand and petit juries. (Source: Digital Journal) 30 years of pedophiles’ court records are sealed in the Rusk, Texas courthouse.

How many child molestation cases did Rusk HS teacher Harold “Bo” Scallon sit on and ‘No Bill’ before he was busted as a purveyor of underage porn? (Source: North Texas e-News)

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(Source:  Rusk Cherokeean; TXDPS)

How many times has District Judge Bascom Bentley’s signature been forged “by permission” on sex offender orders?

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(Source: Jacksonville Progress)

It is the responsibility of the County Clerk to report civil and criminal cases accurately and in a timely manner, whether it is a conviction, expungement, or probated will. Even if the Clerk is related to all reported Parties. Cherokee County prefers to lock court cases away from public scrutiny to cover up the makeup of illegal jury pools and the perjury of prosecutors. The same group of people has been called to sit on grand juries for the last 20 years. Civil cases are routinely heard by jurors who have vested conflicts of interest. Some jurors don’t even live in the county. Some are pedophiles. Cherokee County officials make their own rules and flout their constitutional responsibilities. Things are apparently back to normal as of January 1st.

Source:

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CODE

TITLE 6. RECORDS

SUBTITLE B. COUNTY RECORDS

CHAPTER 191. GENERAL RECORDS PROVISIONS AFFECTING COUNTIES

Sec. 191.001. COUNTY RECORDER; SEAL; GENERAL DUTIES.

Written by Cherokee County, Texas

01/13/2017 at 6:00 PM

Rusk City Manager accused of wiretapping; Sheriff Deputy under Texas Rangers investigation

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drug busts


US Attorney Malcolm Bales announces Jacksonville, TX drug raids with Dallas FBI, Sheriff James Campbell, and District Attorney Rachel Patton. (Source: April 1, 2015 Jacksonville Progress)

Like a lot of areas in backwoods East Texas, Cherokee County law enforcement illegally wiretaps and intercepts telephone conversations to conduct drug raids. For providing this information to outside agencies such as the FBI and Narcotics Task Forces, as well as assisting on drug cases for the US Attorney’s office, these small towns are given carte blanche access to any and every private citizen’s personal and business phone conversations. In fact, they are publicly rewarded for violating federal law like they do in 3rd World countries. They are advised to deny it, lie about it, and continue to provide as much information with as little legwork as possible. The Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department records phone calls to blackmail political opponents and quash dissent among their Good Ol’ Boy and Gal network. They catalog the locals’ extramarital affairs within the District Attorney’s office and hold each other by the balls for Grand Jury selection. And these folks have been screwing each other like rabbits since their High School days.

Who is cheating on whom these days?

With the ousting of outsider Rachel Patton for ruffling their feathers and with Elmer Beckworth returning to the District Attorney’s office in a few weeks, the uninformed public can expect the Night of the Long Knives to come out in full force. When one of them is caught not towing the County line, the fingers start pointing, the accusations start to fly, and the misdirections are set up like traffic cones to mislead the public.  Following in Beckworth’s footsteps they blame the other for their own actions.

 

Corner

Wife swapping and wiretapping? Who’s spying on whom? 

Turmoil-in-Rusk

In an open City Council meeting on July 14, 2016 the Rusk Police Department accused longtime Rusk City Manager Mike Murray  of “illegal wiretapping.”  Lt. Brad George of the Rusk PD and others also accused Murray of “retaliation against the police force.” City council has requested a Texas Rangers investigation during back-to-back closed sessions. (Source: KETK) Murray, the local police department, TDC Skyview, and the Sheriff’s Dept. had worked together for decades without dissent. The internal feud is said to have started after the handling of assault charges against the Volunteer Fire Chief earlier this year.  Nepotism between the Cherokee County Sheriff and his son the Rusk Chief of Police, and their extralegal means of small town social control is on full display for the local media.

 

Clocking in at 300 + lbs., it is highly unlikely Mr. Murray is capable of scaling telephone poles and running outlaw phone drops throughout the county to eavesdrop on local drug dealers, lonely wives, and families of his political opponents; however Sheriff Campbell’s deputies and those related to law enforcement are paid to do so.

Illegal phone tapping in Rusk City Hall

Cherokee County newspapers refuse to mention the reason for the Texas Rangers investigation into Mike Murray and the charge of ILLEGAL PHONE TAPPING that Rachel Patton has recommended to the Texas Attorney General. Instead they focus on a fictitious claim of low morale among the police department and city employees for the reason Murray has been placed on paid administrative leave. (Source: Daily Progress) It takes reports from Tyler and Longview to shine the light on the common Cherokee County practice of “illegally wiretapping phone conversations.” (Source: KETK)

simpsons

OK, boys and girls, let’s play a game called “Follow the Logic…”

  1. Teenage boys driving around on New Year’s Eve amuse themselves by tossing a firecracker near a local fireworks stand operated by the Rusk Volunteer Fire Chief, Donald Lankford.
  2. Pissed off Fire Chief jumps in his car and in a high speed chase into neighboring Anderson County, cuts them off several times, pulls them over and roughs up the pranksters.
  3. Fire Chief is charged with misdemeanor assault in Anderson County; pranksters are let off with a warning.
  4. Fire Chief continues to work at the Rusk, TX Fire Dept. while his case is aired on local television; some reports say he is suspended for 6 months, others say he is still employed. (Source: KETK)
  5. A “rift develops” between the City of Rusk Police Department and the City Manager according to some accounts.
  6. During an open Rusk City Council session in late July, the Rusk PD accuses City Manager of illegally tape recording phone conversations ; Rusk City Council asks the Texas Rangers to intervene and continues to hold closed door hearings to keep prying eyes out of personal vendettas.

Sources: Jacksonville Progress, KETK.

Break the Law- keep your TCLEOSE license and your pension

In yet another example of unaccountability, veteran Cherokee County Sheriff Deputy Donald Williams is asked to quietly retire July 29, 2016 after the Texas Rangers investigate a June 21st incident in Alto, TX. Unlike in other venues throughout the state, no explanation is given to reporters or required by the locals. In fact, they’ll pretend Deputy Williams never even worked there or helped get their cousins elected. Fall housekeeping is in full swing with the Texas Rangers in town to maintain the status quo.

Beware… Elmer Beckworth wants his old job back

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beware

 

Lock up your daughters and lock up your wives. He’s back.

Angelina County Assistant DA and lifetime Democrat Elmer Beckworth (D) announced several months ago he was switching to the Republican Party after remaining a registered Democrat for over 30 years – all the way through two elections of Barrack Obama that didn’t change his mind. Elmer’s flip-flop comes after losing the 2012 Cherokee County District Attorney’s race to his own younger savvier Assistant DA who ran as a Republican. Beckworth had stayed in office three terms, with only 2% of the Cherokee County vote, by running unchallenged and not facing any competition. (Source: Jacksonville Progress) With the help of the Good Ol’ Boy and Biddy Network, he’s hoping to run unchallenged again. Are we to believe Elmer Beckworth is so feckless as to forget he owes his entire career to the Cherokee County Democrats Club? The same people who along with him caucused for Wendy Davis and against the values of every single Republican in the county?

Which begs the question if the current Cherokee County Republican Party will greet with open arms the candidate who has shit smeared them and his potential rivals for decades, in both public and private practice. Will the Chairman be forced to commit suicide over sexual innuendo and blackmail? Will life insurance payouts be divvied up for billboards and television ads as they were for Elmer Beckworth’s predecessors? The fact is Beckworth cannot win an election without the ingrained Rusk/Jacksonville law firms, also devoted lifetime Democrats, trickling votes and money away from a viable opponent. And they can’t run against an honest candidate.

Is Cherokee County still rife enough with corruption as to oust their first female district attorney who took to task District Judge Bascom Bentley’s falsified signature on sex offender Orders? With Beckworth still in office, County Judge Craig Fletcher would not have been exposed for his own shenanigans between Rusk sex offenders and Bentley’s office. (Source: Daily Progress)  Hundreds of thousands of dollars would still be wasted on Robert Fox’s tirades and appealing his overturned conviction in the 6th Court of Appeals, Texarkana. (Again Source: Daily Progress) Every dumb lie coming out of Elmer’s mouth could be in publication in the Jacksonville newspaper and his hometown Rusk Cherokeean for generations to come.

bentley_signature

Will the honest County Commissioners be threatened yet again with Elmer Beckworth’s stacked grand jury, or will the Rusk Hunting Club continue paving their roads with taxpayer dollars? Come this March Primary, businesses in the area will see if Cherokee County puts the target back on them, their business calls, and personal email. Voters can choose between who Sheriff James Campbell and the local papers endorse, and those they will drum out of town (see Ben Tinsley, et al). Such exciting times for the astute Cherokee County voter. But watch out, Elmer’s confidential informants are ready to come out of retirement from the methadone clinics to murder their wives.

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Michael Harris endorses Elmer Beckworth

After all, the Old Wives Family Affair may not have to drive all the way to Lufkin to sit on Elmer’s current bosses’ juries. The Good Ol’ Boys may get their man back in their pockets. Nonetheless, family members of Cherokee County sex offenders are anxiously awaiting to cast their votes for the guy who gave them probation in the first place. If Elmer Beckworth gets his old job back in his hometown of Rusk, the county will be flooded with the likes of extradited child rapist and murderer Tommy Stricklen. (Source: Jacksonville Progress) Guess who got the bigger ticker tape parade in Cherokee County newspapers and raised more money through donations: Beckworth running for reelection or a local sex offender with a handicapped daughter.

Thanks to Elmer Beckworth and his supporters, every single learning institution in Cherokee County has hired child molesters, some who have sat on his juries repeatedly for decades; some who have been exalted in the local newspapers for decades until being caught. Look no further than the sheltered hallways of nearby private Christian academy, The Brook Hill School, quietly scrubbing all records of their recently arrested girls’ volleyball Head Coach. Ricky Eugene Clements, 61,was busted this month for texting a 16-year old female student to “spend the night with him” and driving her off school property without the school’s knowledge or parental consent. (Source: KETK) These too are the people who claim to be Christian Conservatives.

clements brook hill coach

Ricky Clements, Brook Hill Lady Guard head coach (Courtesy: Smith County)

 

Fox sentenced to 1 year minus time served

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Update:  Robert Fox’s felony conviction (Case # 06-13-00056-CR) for “tampering with a government document” was reversed and he was acquitted of all charges in the 6th Court of Appeals, Texarkana on 12/4/13. Fox remains in detention following ICE deportation hearings after serving the entirety of his bogus sentence while waiting for his appeal.

Rusk, TX:

After 8 months of postponements and two trials including a mistrial, Robert Fox was sentenced to 1 year state jail time on December 18, 2012.  Fox was found guilty of “tampering with a government document” back in April 2012. (Source: Tyler Paper) This can be considered a bittersweet victory for outgoing district attorney Elmer Beckworth who won’t be facing Fox’s litany of appeals. From what was front page news of the House of Israel’s “terrorist” leanings, to being called “scofflaws” and “parasites,” the local media has gone silent on the unprecedented postponement of sentencing in the 2nd Judicial District court. There are no reports of the countless waste of taxpayer time and money spent to justify the multiple open-ended raids on the House of Israel. Raids that resulted in not only Not Guilty verdicts and dismissals, but the impetus for Robert Fox to file his tort claim against the City of Jacksonville Risk Management. This piece of paper was presented to Cherokee County juries as a “tampered government document,” even though it was printed on plain white paper with no official letterhead and Fox is not a government employee. Falsely accused of being a fugitive, Fox had spent 146 days in Cherokee County jail, unable to make his excessive bail before his trials. Other than for health reasons, he has made all of his court appearances, and in some cases has successfully represented himself. If not beaten and broke, Robert Fox will have the next 230 + days to ruminate over his next Federal lawsuit against Cherokee County and possibly publish another account of judicial terrorism. Fox is reported to be facing expedited deportation proceedings to quash his attempts at appeal.

Lessons learned: do not set up shop in downtown Jacksonville, TX unless you enjoy being harassed and your business calls intercepted by local law enforcement; if you file a lawsuit against the county, then do so from elsewhere under the advice of an attorney; and most importantly, do not stay in the area after filing your civil rights complaints or you will face a media willing to perpetuate perverse lies designed to justify the county’s systemic corruption. Cherokee County is the first place in the country to sentence a “lightning rod for terrorism” as they called him, to 12 months for a piece of paper that could have been thrown in the trash. Except for the fact they all did answer Fox’s complaint in federal court, including the judge and prosecutor who convicted and sentenced him. (Source: Fox vs. City of Jacksonville, et al Case no. 2:2010cv00158)

As a footnote, Robert James Fox is incarcerated in the Bradshaw Unit, one mile north of Henderson in Rusk County, Texas. His projected release date is 7/30/2013 according to TDCJ online inmate search records.

Written by Cherokee County, Texas

12/21/2012 at 5:00 AM

District Attorney runs Assistant DA as opponent; Attorney General investigates missing $1.3 million Lon Morris endowment

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Rusk, TX:

‘Tis the season to fool everybody, and political ads have run simultaneously in local newspapers pretending not to know of the incestuous politicking of the Cherokee County district attorney’s office. Cherokee County District Attorney Elmer Beckworth (Democrat) is being “challenged” by his assistant district attorney Rachel Patton Rogers, running as a Republican, in the ONLY so-called “contested” race in the county. Beckworth has won praise from his mentor former DA and retired Court of Criminal Appeals Justice Charles Holcomb, who also related to the majority of those at the courthouse, Rusk State Hospital, and remaining county government employees. (Source: Tyler Paper, Nov. 4, 2012)  Family ties go beyond political affiliations, hence public servants’ blatant nepotism for the last 40 years goes unreported during the electoral process. The only party lines in Cherokee County, Texas are the ones used to illegally eavesdrop on each other. So much for small town elections.

Do we really get a choice when one candidate’s only purpose is to keep viable challengers out of the primaries?

It is a common in-your-face tactic of Cherokee County shoring up the election, that is the hedging of votes against potential challengers. Both candidates pretend to be in competition by championing a horrible record of local child molestation cases they shared; over 300+ reported probated child sex offenders during Elmer Beckworth’s 20 year tenure alone. God only knows what the docket doesn’t show. Child molesters and recidivists who are offered probation per Beckworth’s office, and then fail their community service requirements is not a record to run on, but to be ashamed of. Nonetheless, the current district attorney’s further endorsements come from his published jury pools and the former Cherokee County sheriff – now part of a local cattlemen’s association. As long as familial and personal vendettas are played out in their small time political games, no child is safe in Cherokee County. No one is safe.

Ask the parents of molested children in Rusk and Jacksonville forced to live nextdoor to offenders who make sweet deals with the district court. Ask the loved ones slain by Cherokee County drug informants released after repeated bail violations. Asked those pepper sprayed and beaten up by Cherokee County law enforcement during high school events. Ask the sexual assault victims, battered wives and families of missing women who have to sue the county in Federal Court to get their rapes on the record.  Ask the district judge who’s own bailiff is sitting in federal prison for selling crystal meth.

As Assistant District Attorney for 20 years, Elmer Beckworth’s job has been to run interference for his predecessors’ judicial remands. Endorsee Charles Holcomb’s last case as Cherokee County district attorney resulted in the overturning of an innocent man’s so-called “murder for remuneration” conviction that resulted in a commuted life sentence. Even though all evidence pointed elsewhere, then assistant prosecutor Beckworth continued the facade of a bonafide investigation into the murder of Alto, TX feed store owner Jackie Hicks. As a district attorney Beckworth has continued that pattern of lying all the way to the state legislature in Austin.

Daily Progress, June 3, 1993

Rusk Cherokeean Herald, Feb 22, 1996

As Elmer Beckworth’s lead assistant prosecutor, Rachel Patton Rogers worked side-by-side with Beckworth and his investigators. Hence the cycle continues. Beckworth, a life long Democrat, sensed earlier in 2010 the political tides would swing overwhelmingly Republican during this county election cycle. Hence his “first assistant attorney” was quietly shuffled out last year and over onto the local Republican ticket. Are voters actually to believe that both Beckworth and his recruited assistant are vying for the job as Cherokee County’s top prosecutor simply because they appear in opposite political parties? The local newspapers would have their readers believe so. Her job has been to make sure the DA office stays “in the family.” Meanwhile, bogus political ads have been run simultaneously with articles on the Texas Attorney General’s investigation of missing endowment money at the former Lon Morris College. Over $1 million in a restrictive trust fund deposit according to the Rusk Cherokeean is not “missing” at all:

There is no missing money at Lon Morris College. “Contrary to recent news reports, we know where the money went…” (Source: front page Rusk Cherokeean, “No Missing Funds at Lon Morris,” Oct. 31, 2012)

All other legitimate news agencies are reporting the missing Dr. James Long endowment to Lon Morris College, now valued at $1.3 million. (Source: KLTV) By law, college endowment funds are restrictive, in that the principal (the $1 million gift) cannot be spent all at once, only accrued interest per the donation.

JACKSONVILLE, TX (KLTV) –
Months after the oldest two-year university in the state closed its doors, a serious investigation into its finances has been opened. The Texas Attorney General’s office and Lon Morris college are looking for $1.3 Million in missing endowment funds. A Rusk man left the money to the school, but explicitly stated in his will that the money would be transferred to Sam Houston State University if Lon Morris College ever closed its doors.

In 2009, a little more than $1 Million was willed to the school by Lon Morris graduate, Dr. James D. Long.
Because of interest, that endowment would now be worth about $1.3 Million.

The AG’s investigators are demanding a long list of documents, including emails, bank records and minutes from board meetings. They’re looking for anything that leads their office to who was managing the funds that should have been deferred to Sam Houston State University.

The Attorney General’s Office says the missing endowment funds were brought to their attention after a lawyer for the Long Estate contacted the Texas State University System.

(Source: KLTV, “Attorneys question if Lon Morris College honored donor’s will,” Oct. 25, 2012)

Attorney General questions if Lon Morris College honored donor’s will.

Written by Cherokee County, Texas

11/04/2012 at 3:00 AM